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The weird and wonderful: a look at this year's Turner Prize artwork

3 minute read
The weird and wonderful: a look at this year's Turner Prize artwork

Published at 6:32pm 26th September 2016. (Updated at 6:45pm 26th September 2016)

An exhibition of work by the four artists shortlisted for the Turner Prize 2016 has been unveiled today at Tate Britain.

Now in its 32nd year, the prize is awarded to a British artists under fifty for an outstanding exhibition or other presentation of their work in the 12 months before 28 April 2016.

The award is £40,000, with £25,000 going to the winner and £5,000 going to the other shortlisted artists.

This year's work will be shown at Tate Britain from 27 September 2016 until 2 January 2017.

So who's been shortlisted? 

We take a look at this year's artists and some of their work:

Michael Dean

Born in Newcastle 1977, he studied at Goldsmith's College in London.

His work, United Kingdom poverty line for two adults and two children: twenty thousand four hundred and thirty six pounds sterling as published on 1st September 2016, consists of £20,436 in pennies.

This is the amount of money the government states is the minimum that two adults and two children need to survive for a year in the UK. When installing the work, Dean removed one coin, meaning that now the money you see before you is one penny less than the poverty line.

Michael Dean

Courtesy Joe Humphrys © Tate Photography 

Michael Dean

Courtesy Joe Humphrys © Tate Photography 

Anthea Hamilton

Born in London in 1978, she studied at Leeds Metropolitan University and the Royal College of Art, London.

While rooted in the history of sculpture, her work engages in the viewer by her humour and unexpected combinations of images, materials and words, as well as dramatic shifts in scale.

A central feature is her larger than life sculpture of a backside. 'Project for a Door' is part of a series of physical realisations of images taken from her archive.

Anthea Hamilton

Courtesy Joe Humphrys © Tate Photography 

Anthea Hamilton

Courtesy Joe Humphrys © Tate Photography 

Helen Marten

Born in Macclesfield in 1985, she studied at Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts, London and Ruskin School of Fine Art, University of Oxford.

Her sculptures bring together a range of handmade and found objects as varied as cotton buds to fish skins, to create poetic visual puzzles.

In these new contexts, familiar objects become strange and abstract and give rise to new and unexpected stories or ideas.

Helen Marten

Courtesy Joe Humphrys © Tate Photography 

Helen Marten

Courtesy Joe Humphrys © Tate Photography 

Josephine Pryde

Born in 1967 in Alnwick, Northumberland, she studied at Wimbledon School of Art, London and later at Central Saint Martins, London.

In her Turner Prize exhibition, photographs are joined by a stationed model of a train entitled 'The New Media Express in a Temporary Siding (Baby Wants To Ride) 2016.

Tagged by graffiti artists from the cities in which it has previously been exhibited, the train is elevated on a platform, awaiting its next move.

Josephine Pryde

Courtesy Joe Humphrys © Tate Photography 

Josephine Pryde

Courtesy Joe Humphrys © Tate Photography 

The exhibition at Tate Britain will be open daily from 10-6pm.

 

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