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How to beat the 'Culture of Busyness' in the workplace!

work meeting

Constant calls, emails, and meetings… It seems we’re all so busy in the workplace, but still getting nothing done! And now a new report has confirmed this, revealing British workers are spending large portions of the work day on things other than what they were hired to do.

 

The latest research by Workfront, a work management application platform, found workers spend just over a third (39%) of their time at work on their primary duties. Emails and pointless meetings topped the list of things that keep workers from getting the job done so to speak.  

 

For over two-thirds of U.K. workers (68%) wasteful meetings get in their way while just under two-thirds (65%) say excessive emails do and over two in five say it’s mainly unexpected phone calls (45%) to blame.

 

Despite these findings, the study found most time management advice is centred on the assumption that it is possible to fit in everything we must do within our allocated work day.

 

This idea inadvertently leads to the culture of busyness that plagues most workplaces. Many of us say we are busy, but we simply can’t account for how our busyness leads to achievable goals.

 

But UK workers have a few ideas for their bosses - over three-quarters (77%) say the rise of automation will let people think about work in new and innovative ways.

 

While most workers say their workplace encourages them to innovate, two thirds (65%) say they’re so swamped with getting day-to-day work done that they don’t have time to think about the future.

Let's Talk: How to beat the "Culture of busyness" in the workplace!

Constant calls, emails and meetings… It seems we’re all so busy in the workplace, but still getting nothing done! And now a new report has confirmed this, revealing British workers are spending large portions of the work day on things other than what they were hired to do.